iPSC Core Facility

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) generated by forced overexpression of defined transcription factors in somatic cells hold great promise for human disease research and personalized medicine. iPSCs show extensive self-renewal and have the ability to become any cell type in the body, providing an inexhaustible source of cells for in vitro disease modeling studies, screening of pharmacological compounds and regenerative therapies.
Tra1-81 staining of human iPSC colony
Tra1-81 staining of human iPSC colony
The Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) iPSC Core was created to expedite the use of iPSC technology by providing essential services and support to on-campus investigators and the broader scientific community. To achieve this goal the CReM iPSC Core will:
  • Generate and characterize iPSC lines from samples of adult tissues provided by the investigator. For more information visit services (for BU Faculty only).
  • Serve as a repository for sharing control and disease-specific hiPSC lines with internal and external investigators to conduct both basic and translational research. For more information visit our CReM bank.
  • Provide expertise, protocols and training to support work involving human iPSCs.

The CReM IPSC Catalog

The CReM iPSC Catalog is an interactive online catalog of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that are available to the scientific research community upon request. This iPSC catalog was created by the Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) of Boston University and Boston Medical Center and allows users to view, inquire and order iPSCs from the CReM bank of control and disease-specific iPS cell lines including gene-edited and ‘knock-in’ reporter cell lines.

The CReM and CReM iPSC Core maintain a state-of-the-art bank of frozen iPSC lines that have been derived by CReM investigators and made readily available to all Boston University and external investigators. Downloadable iPSC characterization data are also available for most iPSC lines. The iPSC catalog is an automated ordering system that allows investigators to follow the approval status of their requests including Material Transfer Agreements (MTAs) and shipment scheduling.

Disease Specific iPSC biorepositories:

Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD)
Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD)
Sickle Cell Disease
Cystic Fibrosis
Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency
TTR Amyloid Disease (ATTR)
Framingham Heart Study (FHS)
Exceptional longevity (EL)-Specific iPSC Library

Our IPSC bank:

https://stemcellbank.bu.edu/Catalog/Item/Home

iPS Cell Colonies
iPS Cell Colonies

For inquiries concerning available iPS cells please contact us at mfjames@bu.edu

To request an iPSC line(s) please create an account by clicking Login tab (top right of main page) and follow the prompts and guidelines outlined on each page. Order status updates may be accessed through your “My Account” Orders History tab.

Note: Entries in the Search Catalog by Selection & Search Catalog by Keyword sections are combined together to form one search.

human iPSC training course
human iPSC training course

Human iPSC/Lung Differentiation Training Course

Basic iPSC Hands-On Training Course

The CReM iPSC Core is offering basic training in human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) culture for research investigators working with or planning to work with hiPS cells. The hands-on training will take place over 2 weeks (approximately 1 hour per day) and will provide investigators with the techniques necessary to maintain and propagate established iPS cells in their own lab. Training will focus on feeder-free (mTeSR1/Matrigel culture system) hiPS cell culture methods including colony passaging using common cell dissociation reagents and mechanical picking, identification of differentiated cells, cryopreservation and thawing. Detailed SOPs will be provided including methods for characterizing iPSCs for karytoype analysis and for pluripotency by immunofluorescent staining. Prior experience in general cell culture techniques is required.

Please contact Marianne James for further information mfjames@bu.edu
Cost of Training Course: $1200/BU; $1500/non-BU

How to request a line

*Outside investigators and commercial entities please contact the Core Manager Marianne mfjames@bu.edu. Recipients of iPSC lines outside of Boston University need to execute a Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) prior to delivery.

To request a line follow these steps:

  • Send an email to the iPSC Core Manager Marianne James (mfjames@bu.edu) listing the iPSC lines you are requesting.
  • Fill out the Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) Request Form, completing sections 2, 3 and 4 (and only sections 2, 3, and 4; leave all the rest unchanged please). Click the “Save” button at the end of the of the document, and email the form to Marianne James (mfjames@bu.edu). Do not click the “Submit” button.
  • The Boston University Office of Technology Development (OTD)/signing officials will then contact your OTD/signing official with an MTA document that will need to be signed by both your institution as well as the Boston University signing official.
Request a line

Services

iPSC derivation from PBMCs using STEMCCA lentivirus or Sendai virus

For this service we require 8 ml of freshly collected blood in CPT tubes (BD Biosciences – Cat# 362760) or other heparinized or EDTA tubes. Since the blood sample should be processed in less than one hour from the collection, please contact the Core manager to coordinate the delivery. The investigator can also submit frozen PBMCs.

This service takes 2-3 months and includes:

  • Isolation and cryopreservation of PBMCs from peripheral blood
  • Expansion of erythroblasts and mycoplasma testing
    Transduction of erythroblasts with lentivirus or Sendai virus
  • Plating cells onto mitomycin C-treated MEFs and feeding everyday
  • iPSC colony picking
  • Expansion of three iPSC clones
  • Mycoplasma testing
  • Cryopreservation of iPSC lines (2 vials/clone)
  • Shipping of frozen vials to investigator
  • Isolation of fibroblast from skin biopsy
  • Isolation of fibroblasts from freshly collected skin biopsy
  • Expansion of fibroblasts and mycoplasma testing
  • Cryopreservation of early passage fibroblasts for storage
  • and RNA/DNA isolation

iPSC derivation from fibroblasts using STEMCCA lentivirus or Sendai virus

Instead of a skin biopsy, investigators may choose to supply fibroblasts in frozen vials or bring them to the core as live cultures. In such cases, the investigator is required to test the fibroblasts for mycoplasma before submission. Only samples that are negative for mycoplasma will be accepted. The fibroblasts should be proliferating and at a low passage (preferably less than 8). Reprogramming of senescent cells is inefficient.

This service takes 2-3 months and includes:

  • Expansion and cryopreservation of fibroblasts
  • Mycoplasma testing
  • Transduction of fibroblasts with lentivirus or Sendai virus
  • Plating cells onto mitomycin C-treated MEFs and feeding every 24 hours for 30 days
  • iPSC colony picking
  • Expansion of three iPSC clones
  • Mycoplasma testing
  • Cryopreservation of iPSC lines (2 vials/clone)
  • Shipping of frozen vials to investigator

Characterization of iPSC lines

This service takes about 1 month and includes:

  • Immunostaining and gene expression analysis
  • Immunostaining for the pluripotency markers Oct4, TRA-1-81, SSEA1 and SSEA4
  • RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and Real Time qPCR analysis for the expression of endogenous Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Rex1, hTERT and Dnmt3b

Karyotyping

This service takes about 1 month and includes:

  • Expanding the iPSC line to a T25 flask
  • Shipping the iPSC line to Cell Line Genetics for G-band karyotyping

DNA fingerprinting

This service takes about 1 month and includes:

  • Adaptation of the iPSC line to feeder-free culture conditions and genomic DNA extraction
  • Genomic DNA extraction from donor cells (fibroblasts or PBMCs)
  • Shipping the genomic DNA samples to Cell Line Genetics for Short Tandem Repeat (STR) analysis

Expansion and banking on site

The Core can provide expansion and banking services, consisting of long-term storage (three years) of 10 vials of each iPSC line.

ServicesCost*
Isolation of fibroblast from skin biopsy$500.00
Isolation of PBMC's from peripherial blood$500.00
iPSC characterization (ICC, gene expression)$1,450.00/line
Karyotyping$750.00/line
DNA fingerprinting$450.00/line
Expansion and banking on site$1,500.00/line
Basic reprogramming/patient (3 clones/2 vials each)$7,500.00
Mycoplasma test (required)$175.00

iPSC Core Team

David Broderick
iPSC Core Technician
Jean Jyh-Chang, PhD
iPSC Core
Jean Jyh-Chang
Marianne James, PhD
iPSC Core Manager
CReM

Biocomputational Core

The Biocomputational Core at the CReM is responsible for the design and analysis of all biocomputational studies currently ongoing in the different CReM labs. The Core uses different platforms and pipelines (WGS, RNA-seq, differential gene expression, single cell sequencing, DGE, etc) focusing on stem cell identity, differentiation into different lineages and the establishment of cellular state.

Biocomputational Core Team

Feiya Wang
Bioinformatics Research Assistant
Feiya Wang
Pushpinder Bawa, PhD
Bioinformatics Core Manager
CReM
Pushpinder Bawa

The Biocomputational Core at the CReM is responsible for the design and analysis of all biocomputational studies currently ongoing in the different CReM labs. The Core uses different platforms and pipelines (WGS, RNA-seq, differential gene expression, single cell sequencing, DGE, etc) focusing on stem cell identity, differentiation into different lineages and the establishment of cellular state.

We work together with our adjacent Boston University School of Medicine’s Single Cell Core, a facility containing state-of-the-art microfluidic and drop-seq based platforms for the capture, library preparation, and sequencing of single cells. More information available at: https://www.bumc.bu.edu/singlecell/

For internal use only: CReM Project Index (password required)

Protocols

As part of our mission of open-source biology, the Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) makes all of our protocols available to the entire scientific community.

Embryonic Stem Cell Culture Protocols

iPS Cell Core SOPs

ESC/iPSC Directed Differentiation Protocols

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